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14theroze
Forum celebrity

Posts: 353
Location: SW NSW
Registered: October 2007

Using grey water in the garden

Posted 2573 days ago

Plants I have thriving in my garden using grey water:

geranium, daisy, larkspur, capsicum, society garlic, chives, native hibiscus, petunia, snap dragons, dianthus, variegated prostanthera, sweet peas, elephant ears, thyme, oregano, parsley, black eyed susan, white rosemary, a succulent, grapevines, stock, hollyhock, alyssum, cotton lavender. Plus a few others I can't think of the names of.

proteas do not like greywater.
_________
Even the hard, dull, dry ground harbours life - which is brought to the surface with the fresh touch of drenching rain (or the humble watering can).

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sanity
Forum newbie - be nice!

Posts: 20
Location: 3977
Registered: October 2007

RE: Using grey water in the garden

Posted 2566 days ago

I thought you were not supposed to use grey water on vegetables? because of the bacteria associated with it? I know you can use grey water on general plants and its better to use water that has detergent that is ph neuteral? I use water from the kitchen tap ( while waiting for the hot to come through the taps into a bucket) on my vegies and my sons bath water and buckets in the shower goes in the washing machine and then gets drained into the garden through a water hose connected to the washing machine.
_________
Too much soil... not enough plants

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14theroze
Forum celebrity

Posts: 353
Location: SW NSW
Registered: October 2007

RE: Using grey water in the garden

Posted 2566 days ago

By grey water I mean washing machine water. I don't have a good set up to be able to recycle my loo water - that goes straight into the septic. I don't recomend washing machine water on all veges though - my golden nugget pumpkins did not turn out very tasty. I mostly use the grey water on flowering plants, but occasionally I add a vege into the plot that gets watered by grey water. So far I haven't had any problems with this. last year I had some nice squash and lettuce grow in this patch. More lettuce is coming up this year. The capsicum and herbs thrive on this water as well and I don't have a problem with the taste or anything else.

Most of our veges are grown in a different area and we use dam water to water these. I've heard about not being able to use grey water for veges too - my son (who is an avid gardener and reads up a lot on these things) says that most veges are ok, only a few, which he couldn't remember to be able to name, are not recommended to water with grey water.

We recycle our bath and shower water (using buckets) into the loo. sometimes we use the bath water in the washing machine too. One day I'd like to be able to afford to set up my septic so we can recycle all the water we use. It's amazing how much water the washing machine and the loo uses, especially when you have a family.
_________
Even the hard, dull, dry ground harbours life - which is brought to the surface with the fresh touch of drenching rain (or the humble watering can).

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Micheal
Forum stalwart

Posts: 71
Location: Mangerton
Registered: October 2007

RE: Using grey water in the garden

Posted 2565 days ago

Ive just bought my house quite recently and as luck would have it i was able to easily re-direct my bathtub/shower plumbing so it would empty straight out onto my garden, it now waters my front hedge and a row of Camelias.
As for my washing machine water it now gets emptied onto the rear lawns and garden beds etc via a very long extension pipe that i purchased from Bunnings (the lawn loves it).
But as for the toilet water. well we have a policy in our house which is:
"Yellows prety mellow but brown goes down" lol
_________
Sir Micheal of Mangerton

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14theroze
Forum celebrity

Posts: 353
Location: SW NSW
Registered: October 2007

RE: Using grey water in the garden

Posted 2560 days ago

Hi Michael
I'm planning to plant more camelias in my front garden. It's good to know they don't mind wash water. I'm using a long hose that syphons the washing machine water from a barrel into the front garden after I've done a wash (the washing machine pump won't push the water through the length of hose we have efficiently - though I connect the hose initially to start the syphoning going. Fiddly but it works for me). We have a slight down hill slope from front to back and this works well. I need to move the hose around manually though to get even distribution of water. Being on a tight budget, all those time saving sprinkler systems and soaking hoses need to wait.

We don't have a lawn at present, we have to fight off too much pattersons curse and cape weed. Eventually I'd like to exclude those weeds from our house area - presently it's not worth the battle. I will use the washing machine water on our lawn when we finally are able to establish one.
_________
Even the hard, dull, dry ground harbours life - which is brought to the surface with the fresh touch of drenching rain (or the humble watering can).

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14theroze
Forum celebrity

Posts: 353
Location: SW NSW
Registered: October 2007

RE: Using grey water in the garden

Posted 2559 days ago

Here's some good advice to take into account when using grey water found on this forum

http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/factsheets/Co
nservation-and-the-Environment/Grey-Water/3082


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Things I've taken into account when using grey water.
The advantage I have in my garden is that the soil is a porous clay loam (and I've added mulch to improve it's water absorbtion and retaining capacity) . Water does seep through the garden, though slowly, and I hill up the edges of the garden to prevent water run off and wastage. I only use tank water when establishing seedlings. I use dam water for most of my back garden and tree watering, including the vege patch. The greywater is used in the front garden where I've planted mostly flowering plants. Occasionally I will water this garden with dam water as well. My property is on a slight slope also which allows for eventual run off of water (usually only when there is any decent amount of rain) that might remove some of the chemicals deposited by the greywater used.

I vary the washing powders I use in the washing machine, but always look for environmentally friendly brands. These products are well diluted before I syphon them into the garden, they are never sprayed onto the plants. If I soak anything in soaking solution that wash goes into the septic.

The chemicals from any detergents I use have a long way to go to reach any kind of natural water ways from my house, they have plenty of chance to break down. The nearest dam (besides ours) is about 1/2 a km away, the nearest creek 2 kms away (and usually bone dry) and the nearest creek with water in it is about 10 kms away on the other side of the hill.
_________
Even the hard, dull, dry ground harbours life - which is brought to the surface with the fresh touch of drenching rain (or the humble watering can).

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